WV40: Clinimetrics: Assessing Measurement Properties of Health Measurement Instruments

Clinimetrics is the scientific discipline that aims to (1) develop methods of assessing the properties of health measurement instruments, (2) apply those methods to develop new, or evaluate existing, health measurement instruments, with the aim (3) to improve the quality of measurements.

(If there is [full] to a course, please do sign up, but you will be placed on a waiting list. Once there is an open spot we will contact you. At that point you can decide whether to participate in the course.)



Date:
11, 12, 13 January 2017 Tuition fee: € 1.315,-
City:
Soesterberg
Course coordinator:
Mw. prof. ir. H.C.W. de Vet, PhD
Language:
English
Learning method:
Lectures and Group work
Examination:
Written exam (facultative)
Examination dates:
See schedule at 'Tentamens'
Number of EC:
3
Details:
The course takes place in a conference hotel
  • Course description

    Clinimetrics is the scientific discipline that aims to (1) develop methods of assessing the properties of health measurement instruments, (2) apply those methods to develop new, or evaluate existing, health measurement instruments, with the aim (3) to improve the quality of measurements. The choice of an appropriate measurement instrument is a key issue in all scientific research. Measurement instruments are required to assess outcomes (e.g. to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions), to diagnose, and to prognosticate. Approaches to gathering data vary widely, from physical examinations to laboratory tests, from imaging techniques to self-report questionnaires. Clinical and health researchers always need to find the best instruments for their particular research and, if none are available, develop new ones.

    The course is on evaluation of the quality of measurement instruments and the quality of clinimetric studies (i.e. studies on measurement properties). The emphasis is on knowing “what to measure”, by a detailed definition of the construct of interest, based on conceptual models. We continue by discussing dimensionality (factor analysis), internal consistency, and an introduction to IRT methods. Specific sessions will focus on reliability (particularly the distinction between reliability and measurement error), validity (with the emphasis on content validity and hypotheses testing) and responsiveness. We will also look at how to assess an instrument’s interpretability (in terms of the smallest detectable change and minimum important change). The course ends with a summary.

    There will be lectures with working groups in between, to discuss the content of the lectures and to practice with assessment and interpretation of the various measurement properties. For one assignment, i.e. on the calculation and interpretation of measurement error and reliability, a computer with SPSS is required.

  • Faculty
    Prof. Henrica C.W. de Vet, PhD, course coordinator
    Professor of Clinimetrics
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and the EMGO Institute of Health and Care Research, both at VU University Medical Center.

    Professor Riekie de Vet is first author of the textbook Measurement in Medicine, and published a large number of educational papers on clinimetrics. She has been teaching clinimetrics in post graduate courses for 15 years.Her research focuses on the methodology of measurements, with applications in the field of musculoskeletal disorders and end of life care. She has (co-)authored more than 280 peer-reviewed publications and has been the (co-)supervisor of 20 completed PhD-trajectories.


    Caroline B. Terwee, PhD
    Assistant professor of Clinimetrics
    Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics. VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam

    Dr. Caroline Terwee is coordinator of the knowledge center measurement instruments of the VU University Medical Center. Her expertise is on the development and evaluation of measurement instrument and related methodological issues, with a special interest in systematic reviews of measurement instruments. She (co)-authored more than 70 international peer reviewed papers on measurement issues and is co-author of the book “Measurement in Medicine”.

    Wieneke.B. Mokkink, PhD
    Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics. VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam

    Dr. Wieneke Mokkink is a post doc researcher with expertise on the evaluation of measurement instrument. She wrote her thesis on the COSMIN study (a methodological study on quality assessment of clinimetric studies), and co-authored the book “Measurement in Medicine”. She is internship coordinator of EpidM students.

  • Learning objectives

    After attending the course, students will be familiar with the most important characteristics of research instruments and how to assess them appropriately. They will also be able to choose the measurement instrument that is most appropriate to their own research and, if necessary, to develop a new one.

    1. The student can describe the required steps for the evaluation of measurement instruments:

    a. The student can define a construct of interest and place this in a conceptual model
    b. The student can explain the difference between reflective and formative measurement models
    c. The student can describe the basic principles of qualitative research methods that are being used in instrument development
    d. The student can describe the aim and methods of pilot-testing and field-testing.

    2. The student can describe the terminology and definitions of all measurement properties and how they are related (COSMIN taxonomy).

    3. The student can reflect on the most important design requirements for studies on measurement properties.

    4. The student can describe the most appropriate statistical methods for evaluating measurement properties and criteria for good measurement properties.

    5. The student is able to calculate the following statistical parameters: Intraclass Correlation Coefficients, Standard Error of Measurement, Smallest Detectable Change, Kappa, percentage agreement, Cronbach’s alpha, and Minimal Important Change.

    6. The student is able to interpret change scores using the principles of Minimal Important Change and Smallest Detectable Change.

    7. The student can explain the basic principles of Confirmatory Factor Analyses and why it is preferred over Exploratory Factor Analysis; can describe situations in which to apply Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor analysis and is able to interpret fit statistics for Confirmatory Factor Analysis.The student can explain the basic principles of Item Response Theory and its assumptions; can explain what is meant by differential item functioning, and can mention methods to assess differential item functioning.

  • Target group and course requirements

    Target group

    The course is designed for healthcare practitioners and researchers who are active in medical, allied health, psychological, or behavioural research and who deal with the development, evaluation, and interpretation of health measurements.

    Course requirements

    Attendants are expected to have at least basic knowledge of epidemiological and statistical methods.
    In one of the workshops it is useful if you bring a laptop.

  • Course material and literature

    Course material

    On the first day of the course you will receive a course pack containing copies of all lecture presentations, assignments, and feedback on these assignments.

    Literature

    Henrica C. W. de Vet, Caroline B. Terwee, Lidwine B. Mokkink, Dirk L. Knol, Measurement in Medicine. 2011. Cambridge University Press. ISBN:9780521133852

  • Accomodation

    This course is organized in a FULL BOARD Conference Hotel.
    In the tuition fee of this Winter Course the hotel accommodation (room, meals, coffee and tea) is included from Wednesday January 11 until Friday January 13 (2 nights).

    If you like, you can register for an extra overnight stay before the start of the course on Tuesday January 10. This extra night is not included in the tuition fee. The price will be Euro 75,-, including breakfast..
    In November we will sent you more information about how you can register for this extra night, together with other additional practical information about the course.

    Conference Hotel Kontakt der Kontinenten
    Amersfoortsestraat 20
    3769 AS Soesterberg
    Tel: + 31 346 35 17 55
    www.kontaktderkontinenten.nl
    How to reach the hotel:
    http://www.kontaktderkontinenten.nl/conferentiehotel/Contact/Routebeschrijving.aspx

  • Exam and accreditation

    Exam

    Participants who take this course as part of the Master Epidemiology always complete the course with an exam. Other participants can choose if they want to complete the course with an exam.
    The exam will be in English. Only when you pass the exam you get a certificate showing the credits (study points/EC).
    The examination dates can be found on the website of EpidM.

    Anyone who wants to participate in the examination should apply at least four weeks before the exam to register via the website: https://epidm.nl/nl/tentamens/

    The examination material of reference and questions to practice can be found on the intranet page of the course (see above).

    During the examinations of EpidM the use of e-books is forbidden

    Accreditation points

    Only for Dutch students!
    If you wish to be considered for accreditation points connected to this course, you must sign the attendance list on the last day of the course.

    To qualify for the accreditation points, you must have been present throughout the course.

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